All posts by angela

CTBites: June 4, 2015

WC-Press-CTbites-06072015We are honored to be listed as one of the top 10 burgers in Southwest Connecticut, with the lead picture!

“The killer ingredient was the Bourbon onions… these were some of the most delicious caramelized onions I have ever tasted.  They were sweet, buttery and the slight crispiness from the grill was a bonus.”

Read more:  CTBites.com

This story has also been printed in:
Connecticut Magazine and on CTNews.com

CTBites: May 31, 2015

WC-Press-CTbites-05312015Walrus + Carpenter’s pig roasts are great for summer catering, notes CTBites.

If you are looking for a way to dazzle your guests with something flavorful and memorable, Walrus + Carpenter is the place to call!

Read more:  CTBites.com

This story has also been printed in:
CTNews.com

DIY Lifestyle: May 7, 2015

WC-Press-DIYLifestyle-05072015We’ve done barn weddings, pig roast dinners and had private rehearsal dinners.  Weddings have become a great part of our summer season,” says Joseph Farrell, owner of Walrus + Carpenter, an upscale smokehouse and gastropub in Connecticut.  “People are looking for something quality and memorable on these special occasions; something more flavorful than the typical trays of food offered by traditional catering halls.

Read more:  DIYLifestyle.com

CTbites: May 6, 2015

WC-Press-CTbites-05062015“Ben explains that the secret to superior smoked meat is the “reverse-flow” element to the smoker. “Reverse-flow” means that the heat drafts from the firebox into the cooking cylinder and draws down under a baffled-flue to the end. Then it reverses the flow and drafts back over the top of the heated baffle-flue. This process keeps the meat moist and tender and allows for the most even cooking experience. As the meat cooks, the fat is rendered out and moisture is locked in. Ben tends to the massive fire, kept between 220 and 250 at all times and adds a log or two – oak, cherry or maple, every 45 minutes or so to keep the temperature even. This is the secret to burning a clean fire – adding just the right amount of wood.”

Read more:  CTbites.com